1950’s house with single sockets in the rooms

I own a 1950’s house with single sockets in the rooms – I think these are pretty much the original sockets as they are not sunken into the walls but stick out. I would like to add 2 extra sockets in the main room and 2 more in the lounge. What do I need to consider before getting someone in? Does this mean the fusebox has to be replaced? will the new sockets be sunken in and not match the existing? Do they all need to be sunken in? Could the old fusebox handle extra sockets? What disruption to walls / floorboards / carpets will this be?

Denise - CR4

Asked: February 28 2018


ANSWERS

RCD protection would be needed for any additions to the circuit. If the wiring is all original, a replacement consumer unit is probably a good idea, as the whole electrical system will be tested at the time of replacement. There would be disruption to the walls and floors while adding extra sockets, unless you have the new wiring in surface trunking. It's is personal preference as to whether the sockets are sunk in as it is purely cosmetic. The existing sockets could be converted to double socket outlets without the need to add RCD protection, but as previously stated the installation may benefit from a full test and the new consumer unit would increase the safety of the entire installation.

Riverside Electrical & Property Services

March 08 2018


RCD protection is not required as long as your system meets the requirements of the regulations it was designed to. New socket heights only apply to new builds. The only requirement is that sockets are not sunken in on skirting boards. A minor works certificate is all that is required if only adding sockets to existing circuit unless in a special location

Mal Electrics

March 10 2018


Any additional sockets will need to be protected by an rcd.. If your consumer unit has this already no problem. If not it will be wise to upgrade it to new regs

A.P.STODDARD

March 08 2018


If the wiring is original 1950s still (i.e. never been rewired) then the cable could be rubber which may be perished, a quick inspection by an electrician would find out if this is the case. All sockets should be RCD protected which has been a requirement on new installations for many years now (I understand yours is an old installation) as you are improving and potentially adding additional sockets the installation must be brought up to the new standards.

GT Electrics Ltd

March 09 2018


Everthing has been said in replies already. Price range £250 - £380

PJW Electrical

March 09 2018


Mild disruption to walls due to hieght requirements of 17th ed regs Will need to be rcd protected so possibly a new Fuseboard would recommend recessing all sockets new and old for aesthetics hope that helps

AGH Property Services

March 08 2018


Rewire

TB Electrical Contractors

March 08 2018


Chances are if the sockets are that original the wiring will need looking at and yes board will definitely need to be changed

Inspired Electrical Contractors Ltd

March 08 2018


The sockets can be sunken or not depending on what you want. The fusebox will handle extra sockets. An electrician may recommend upgrading the fusebox if it is too old.

Stephen Goulding

March 08 2018


The sockets can be sunken or not depending on what you want. The fusebox will handle extra sockets. An electrician may recommend upgrading the fusebox if it is too old.

Stephen Goulding

March 08 2018


This can be done 2 ways either by trunking around the skirting boards from old sockets to new unsunk sockets or by wiring additional sockets from under floor boards. Fuse board should be fine to cope with extra sockets.

X-Static Electrics

March 08 2018


Rewire call me 07958767594

RWD Electrical Ltd

March 08 2018


1950s House , with one socket in every room , An Electrical Installation Condition Report is Recommend before any work is carried out , the 17th Edition Wiring regulation Amd.3 Requirements state that Cabling must be fit for purpose and are Tested before extension work is carried out. 60+ years cabling will not meet British Standards Replacing the Fuseboard would be a start Very Difficult to Advise with out seeing or Testing the systems Installed

Steven Hirst Electrical

March 08 2018


There are many options its best to get an electrician to take a look then will be able to advice correctly

Horace Cliff

March 08 2018


If you still have original sockets from 1950 , have the wiring checked , if it's not been rewired since 1950 then would most probably need rewiring and new consumer unit, you can have as many sockets as you wish then. If you don't require rewire then sockets can be added, single sockets can be converted to doubles. Its debatable whether additional sockets have to be at new regulations heights, it will look odd if sockets are different heights in same room. Additional RCD protection is recommended but not mandatory unless a new circuit is installed, beware scaremongering electricians.

Peter Griffiths

March 08 2018


for advice call us on 07877433741 SS.ELECTRICAL SERVICES

SS Electrical Services

March 08 2018


You being told the board has to be changed is absolute rubbish. You need RCD protection for the new sockets but this doesn't have to be at the board, you can by sockets with RCD protection. Don't be pressured into the expense. unless you wish for a full upgrade.

ELECTRICAL MATTERS

March 08 2018